© 2014-2017 Carol L. Melnick. All rights reserved.                                             Website by Verity Graphics
Bioenergetic Analyst   Relational Life Couples Therapist
Carol L. Melnick BSc, MSW, RSW, CBT
Why focus on breathing?     Breathing is intimately connected to our emotional states.  An anxious person often breathes shallowly and primarily from their chest.  The diaphragm is often contracted due to fear and a deeper belly breathing that aids relaxation doesn't happen.  A depressed  person usually does not breathe fully which limits their physical and emotional energy.  To breathe deeply is to be fully alive.  We have more energy and more access to our feelings. Is my life experience connected to my breathing patterns?      Bioenergetic Analysis (BA) recognizes that our experience leaves physical imprints and affects our “brain wiring” from our earliest days of childhood.  Our physiological responses to events are stored in our cells, our muscles, and our minds.  Negative stored memories and emotions can affect breathing, relaxation, our ability to feel “truly ourselves” and grounded, and our ability to feel connected with others.     BA also recognizes that difficult childhood experiences occur in the context of close relationships with parents & caregivers and that healing requires a nurturing and safe relationship in the present.  BA invites people to work with emotional expression, breathing, and grounding while being supported and protected by a trained and caring therapist. What about “negative emotions”  (anger, shame, inadequacy, etc.)?     Many of us have learned that certain emotions are “unacceptable” and some of us are afraid of our feelings and what our bodies communicate to us.  Nevertheless both neuroscience and life experience teach us that our feelings, rooted in our bodies, are our best guide to our needs.     Of course, it's important to sort out which feelings come from “here and now” present day experiences and which feelings may be intense, longlasting or “out of proportion” due to childhood feelings that were suppressed for emotional survival.  On the “child level” we need therapeutic support to work through our feelings and the knowledge that is being expressed through our bodies.  On an “adult level”, we may need to learn “containment” where we experience our feelings and “wait” for the appropriate time to express them. What types of issues benefit from mind/body psychotherapy?     Many people have a sense that they are alienated from their own bodies or they suffer body symptoms which they suspect have an emotional component. Persons who suffered insecure attachment with caregivers, persons with developmental trauma in childhood,  those who struggle with food or other dependencies, and people who want healthier intimate relationships commonly seek this type of therapeutic approach. What evidence is there that bioenergetic analysis is effective?     Under the resource section, there are websites with scientific articles providing some evaluation of this approach.  Most of us also need to evaluate this approach for ourselves.  “People who have experienced this powerful combination of safe relationship and full expression of themselves through their bodies testify that they have renewed energy they can apply towards healthy pleasure and purpose in life” (NYSBA website).
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© 2014-2017 Carol L. Melnick. All rights reserved.   Website by  Verity Graphics
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Bioenergetic Analyst   Relational Life Couples Therapist
Why focus on breathing?     Breathing is intimately connected to our emotional states.  An anxious person often breathes shallowly and primarily from their chest.  The diaphragm is often contracted due to fear and a deeper belly breathing that aids relaxation doesn't happen.  A depressed  person usually does not breathe fully which limits their physical and emotional energy.  To breathe deeply is to be fully alive.  We have more energy and more access to our feelings. Is my life experience connected to my breathing patterns?      Bioenergetic Analysis (BA) recognizes that our experience leaves physical imprints and affects our “brain wiring” from our earliest days of childhood.  Our physiological responses to events are stored in our cells, our muscles, and our minds.  Negative stored memories and emotions can affect breathing, relaxation, our ability to feel “truly ourselves” and grounded, and our ability to feel connected with others.     BA also recognizes that difficult childhood experiences occur in the context of close relationships with parents & caregivers and that healing requires a nurturing and safe relationship in the present.  BA invites people to work with emotional expression, breathing, and grounding while being supported and protected by a trained and caring therapist. What about “negative emotions”  (anger, shame, inadequacy, etc.)?     Many of us have learned that certain emotions are “unacceptable” and some of us are afraid of our feelings and what our bodies communicate to us.  Nevertheless both neuroscience and life experience teach us that our feelings, rooted in our bodies, are our best guide to our needs.     Of course, it's important to sort out which feelings come from “here and now” present day experiences and which feelings may be intense, longlasting or “out of proportion” due to childhood feelings that were suppressed for emotional survival.  On the “child level” we need therapeutic support to work through our feelings and the knowledge that is being expressed through our bodies.  On an “adult level”, we may need to learn “containment” where we experience our feelings and “wait” for the appropriate time to express them. What types of issues benefit from mind/body psychotherapy?     Many people have a sense that they are alienated from their own bodies or they suffer body symptoms which they suspect have an emotional component. Persons who suffered insecure attachment with caregivers, persons with developmental trauma in childhood,  those who struggle with food or other dependencies, and people who want healthier intimate relationships commonly seek this type of therapeutic approach. What evidence is there that bioenergetic analysis is effective?     Under the resource section, there are websites with scientific articles providing some evaluation of this approach.  Most of us also need to evaluate this approach for ourselves.  “People who have experienced this powerful combination of safe relationship and full expression of themselves through their bodies testify that they have renewed energy they can apply towards healthy pleasure and purpose in life” (NYSBA website).

 

  
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